Mosquitoes are small insects slender body. The head has a pair of antennae forming a V directed towards the front. Females of the antennas are discrete, whereas males are feathery.

The head also wears a long "trunk" or proboscis characteristic. That of the female has very slender mouth parts which allow it to pierce the skin of vertebrates which it draws blood. The mouthparts of the male, which does not itch, are less rigid.

Life cycle

The life cycle of these insects varies by species. In all mosquitoes, egg, larva and pupa are aquatic, while the adult is air.

How to recognize the Mosquito:

The female mosquito mates 48 hours after hatching. The accouplemenet occurs only once in his life as it can fertilize itself the eggs with sperm that she keeps in bags. After mating, the female feeds on blood. She lays 25 to 300 eggs depending on the species in a water body. The larvae hatch a few days later and feed on algae and organic particles. The larvae molt four times before becoming pupae become adult mosquitoes. The mosquito life cycle lasts less than a month.

When a mosquito bites a host, it can contaminate the disease carried by this host and retransmit when sting again. Thus, the mosquito vector of serious diseases such as malaria, malaria and filariasis. In addition, the bite causes unpleasant and sometimes allergic reactions redness.

Mating occurs in flight or in the vegetation. Once fertilized, the female goes in search of a blood meal source of protein required for the formation of eggs. A few days later, she lays in different aquatic environments or on moist soil. 50 to 300 eggs are laid, depending on species.

The adult emergence takes place at the surface of the water. The mosquito remains on the surface until its wings and body dry. The males congregate in swarms, and the females come join them.

The adult emergence takes place at the surface of the water. The mosquito remains on the surface until its wings and body dry. The males congregate in swarms, and the females come join them.